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1

A great conflict was about to come off between the Birds and the Beasts.
When the two armies were collected together the Bat hesitated which to join.
The Birds that passed his perch said:
"Come with us"; but he said: "I am a Beast."
Later on, some Beasts who were passing underneath him looked up and said:
"Come with us"; but he said: "I am a Bird."
Luckily at the last moment peace was made, and no battle took place, so the Bat came to the Birds and wished to join in the rejoicings, but they all turned against him and he had to fly away.
He then went to the Beasts, but soon had to beat a retreat, or else they would have torn him to pieces. 
"Ah," said the Bat, "I see now, He that is neither one thing nor the other has no friends."

2

An Arab Camel-driver having completed the lading of his Camel, asked him which he would like best, to go up hill or down hill.
The poor beast replied, not without a touch of reason: "Why do you ask me? Is it that the level way through the desert is closed?"

3

On a summer day, when the great heat induced a general thirst, a Lion and a Boar came at the same moment to a small well to drink.
They fiercely disputed which of them should drink first, and were soon engaged in the agonies of a mortal combat.
On their stopping on a sudden to take breath for the fiercer renewal of the strife, they saw some Vultures waiting in the distance to feast on the one which should fall first.
They at once made up their quarrel, saying:
"It is better for us to make friends, than to become the food of Crows or Vultures, as will certainly happen if we are disabled.”

4

 The Lion once gave out that he was sick unto death and summoned the animals to come and hear his last Will and Testament.
So the Goat came to the Lion's cave, and stopped there listening for a long time.
Then a Sheep went in, and before she came out a Calf came up to receive the last wishes of the Lord of the Beasts.
But soon the Lion seemed to recover, and came to the mouth of his cave, and saw the Fox, who had been waiting outside for some time. "Why do you not come to pay your respects to me?" said the Lion to the Fox.
"I beg your Majesty's pardon," said the Fox, "but I noticed the track of the animals that have already come to you; and while I see many hoof-marks going in, I see none coming out. Till the animals that have entered your cave come out again I prefer to remain in the open air.”

5

A Countryman's son by accident trod upon a Serpent's tail, which turned and bit him so that he died.
The father in a rage got his axe, and pursuing the Serpent, cut off part of its tail.
So the Serpent in revenge began stinging several of the Farmer's cattle and caused him severe loss.
Well, the Farmer thought it best to make it up with the Serpent, and brought food and honey to the mouth of its lair, and said to it: "Let's forget and forgive; perhaps you were right to punish my son, and take vengeance on my cattle, but surely I was right in trying to revenge him; now that we are both satisfied why should not we be friends again?"

"No, no," said the Serpent; "take away your gifts; you can never forget the death of your son, nor I the loss of my tail.”

6

One day the Countrymen noticed that the Mountains were in labour; smoke came out of their summits, the earth was quaking at their feet, trees were crashing, and huge rocks were tumbling.
They felt sure that something horrible was going to happen.
They all gathered together in one place to see what terrible thing this could be.
They waited and they waited, but nothing came.
At last there was a still more violent earthquake, and a huge gap appeared in the side of the Mountains.
They all fell down upon their knees and waited.
At last, and at last, a teeny, tiny mouse poked its little head and bristles out of the gap and came running down towards them, and ever after they used to say: "Much outcry, little outcome.”

7

A Lion used to prowl about a field in which Four Oxen used to dwell.
Many a time he tried to attack them; but whenever he came near they turned their tails to one another, so that whichever way he approached them he was met by the horns of one of them.
At last, however, they fell a-quarrelling among themselves, and each went off to pasture alone in a separate corner of the field.
Then the Lion attacked them one by one and soon made an end of all four.

8

It happened that a Dog had got a piece of meat and was carrying it home in his mouth to eat it in peace.
Now on his way home he had to cross a plank lying across a running brook.
As he crossed, he looked down and saw his own shadow reflected in the water beneath.
Thinking it was another dog with another piece of meat, he made up his mind to have that also.
So he made a snap at the shadow in the water, but as he opened his mouth the piece of meat fell out, dropped into the water and was never seen more.

1

A great conflict was about to come off between the Birds and the Beasts.
When the two armies were collected together the Bat hesitated which to join.
The Birds that passed his perch said:
"Come with us"; but he said: "I am a Beast."
Later on, some Beasts who were passing underneath him looked up and said:
"Come with us"; but he said: "I am a Bird."
Luckily at the last moment peace was made, and no battle took place, so the Bat came to the Birds and wished to join in the rejoicings, but they all turned against him and he had to fly away.
He then went to the Beasts, but soon had to beat a retreat, or else they would have torn him to pieces. 
"Ah," said the Bat, "I see now, He that is neither one thing nor the other has no friends."

2

An Arab Camel-driver having completed the lading of his Camel, asked him which he would like best, to go up hill or down hill.
The poor beast replied, not without a touch of reason: "Why do you ask me? Is it that the level way through the desert is closed?"

3

On a summer day, when the great heat induced a general thirst, a Lion and a Boar came at the same moment to a small well to drink.
They fiercely disputed which of them should drink first, and were soon engaged in the agonies of a mortal combat.
On their stopping on a sudden to take breath for the fiercer renewal of the strife, they saw some Vultures waiting in the distance to feast on the one which should fall first.
They at once made up their quarrel, saying:
"It is better for us to make friends, than to become the food of Crows or Vultures, as will certainly happen if we are disabled.”

4

 The Lion once gave out that he was sick unto death and summoned the animals to come and hear his last Will and Testament.
So the Goat came to the Lion's cave, and stopped there listening for a long time.
Then a Sheep went in, and before she came out a Calf came up to receive the last wishes of the Lord of the Beasts.
But soon the Lion seemed to recover, and came to the mouth of his cave, and saw the Fox, who had been waiting outside for some time. "Why do you not come to pay your respects to me?" said the Lion to the Fox.
"I beg your Majesty's pardon," said the Fox, "but I noticed the track of the animals that have already come to you; and while I see many hoof-marks going in, I see none coming out. Till the animals that have entered your cave come out again I prefer to remain in the open air.”

5

A Countryman's son by accident trod upon a Serpent's tail, which turned and bit him so that he died.
The father in a rage got his axe, and pursuing the Serpent, cut off part of its tail.
So the Serpent in revenge began stinging several of the Farmer's cattle and caused him severe loss.
Well, the Farmer thought it best to make it up with the Serpent, and brought food and honey to the mouth of its lair, and said to it: "Let's forget and forgive; perhaps you were right to punish my son, and take vengeance on my cattle, but surely I was right in trying to revenge him; now that we are both satisfied why should not we be friends again?"

"No, no," said the Serpent; "take away your gifts; you can never forget the death of your son, nor I the loss of my tail.”

6

One day the Countrymen noticed that the Mountains were in labour; smoke came out of their summits, the earth was quaking at their feet, trees were crashing, and huge rocks were tumbling.
They felt sure that something horrible was going to happen.
They all gathered together in one place to see what terrible thing this could be.
They waited and they waited, but nothing came.
At last there was a still more violent earthquake, and a huge gap appeared in the side of the Mountains.
They all fell down upon their knees and waited.
At last, and at last, a teeny, tiny mouse poked its little head and bristles out of the gap and came running down towards them, and ever after they used to say: "Much outcry, little outcome.”

7

A Lion used to prowl about a field in which Four Oxen used to dwell.
Many a time he tried to attack them; but whenever he came near they turned their tails to one another, so that whichever way he approached them he was met by the horns of one of them.
At last, however, they fell a-quarrelling among themselves, and each went off to pasture alone in a separate corner of the field.
Then the Lion attacked them one by one and soon made an end of all four.

8

It happened that a Dog had got a piece of meat and was carrying it home in his mouth to eat it in peace.
Now on his way home he had to cross a plank lying across a running brook.
As he crossed, he looked down and saw his own shadow reflected in the water beneath.
Thinking it was another dog with another piece of meat, he made up his mind to have that also.
So he made a snap at the shadow in the water, but as he opened his mouth the piece of meat fell out, dropped into the water and was never seen more.